I was reading Richard Lovelace and ran across this Edwards quote:

Spiritual pride is the main door by which the devil comes into the hearts of those who are zealous for the advancement of Christianity. It is the chief inlet of smoke from the bottomless pit, to darken the mind and mislead the judgment. It is the main source of all the mischief the devil introduces, to clog and hinder a work of God.

Spiritual pride tends to speak of other persons’ sins with bitterness or with laughter and levity and an air of contempt. But pure Christian humility rather tends either to be silent about these problems or to speak of them with grief and pity. Spiritual pride is very apt to suspect others, but a humble Christian is most guarded about himself. He is as suspicious of nothing in the world as he is of his own heart. The proud person is apt to find fault with other believers, that they are low in grace, and to be much in observing how cold and dead they are and to be quick to note their deficiencies. But the humble Christian has so much to do at home and sees so much evil in his own heart and is so concerned about it that he is not apt to be very busy with other hearts. He is apt to esteem others better than himself. (emphasis mine)

– Jonathan Edwards

Destinations

May 9, 2013

B003D0TAM8.01._SX490_SCLZZZZZZZ_V190274968_If you are getting older, like me, you have probably thought about the fact that the day might come when you won’t be able to care for yourself. If you are like me, you probably push that thought to the far recesses of your mind hoping that that eventuality never transpires. We don’t want to be a burden to our children or anyone else for that matter. Russell Moore writes about why we really don’t want to be a burden to our children. You might be surprised at what he says.

This map shows that over half of the world lives in one incredibly small area. Keep praying.

Preaching is about Jesus. While talks might be informative, insightful, and even encouraging, if they aren’t about Jesus ultimately the information, insight, and encouragement isn’t from the gospel. It might be helpful but it isn’t the help Jesus died to give. Even though the talk might be heard in a church with Bibles open, it still isn’t the good news. John Koessler reminds us that Jesus has to be part of every sermon.

“My Dear Wormwood,

Your patient has become humble; have you drawn his attention to the fact? All virtues are less formidable to us once the man is aware that he has them, but this is especially true of humility. Catch him at the moment when he is really poor in spirit and smuggle into his mind the gratifying reflection, “By jove! I’m being humble”, and almost immediately pride – pride at his own humility – will appear. If he awakes to the danger and tries to smother this new form of pride, make him proud of his attempt – and so on, through as many stages as you please. But don’t try this too long, for fear you awake his sense of humor and proportion, in which case he will merely laugh at you and go to bed.

Your affectionate uncle,
Screwtape”

C.S. Lewis, The Screwtape Letters, Chapter 14.